Eggplant Rollatini Recipe

This low carb eggplant rollatini recipe is full of your favorite Italian textures and flavors but without the heavy carbs. Eggplant is sliced thinly, dipped in egg and a low-carb coating mixture that has been seasoned with Italian herbs, then it’s baked until golden, filled with a creamy ricotta, covered in tomatoes and Mozzarella cheese and baked again. The result is a gooey, creamy, crunchy bite of Italian flavor without the carbs. And it’s wonderful.

This low carb eggplant rollatini recipe has all the flavor and texture of the original but with under 6 carbs.  restlesschipotle.com

I love Italian food. The rumor is that I am part Italian (I am adopted) and that the person who fathered me was the son of people who owned an Italian restaurant in Chicago in the 1950s. According to the story that I have, my birth mom was a runaway, got a job in a restaurant, and hooked up with the son. When the Italian mama found out she paid my birth mom to hit the road. So, in my imagination I am related to wealthy restauranteurs who dabbled in the mafia… because… Chicago.

It does explain my love for Italian food and weaponry of all kinds, though, doesn’t it?

I hate that all of the Italian food that I love so much is so high in carbs. A plate of ravioli will make me gain 5 pounds in water weight in a 24 hour period — and I am talking about a normal plate size, not pounds of the stuff. Eggplant rollatini and eggplant parmesan (other favorites) are swathed in thick layers of carby breading. Garlic bread, spaghetti — the list goes on and on.

Low carb eggplant rollatini recipe is perfect when you are craving Italian food. Restlesschipotle.com

I saw some gorgeous eggplant in the store and it occurred to me that I might be able to create a lower carb version of my favorite eggplant dish. I love a good, crunchy eggplant rollatini recipe with the eggplant rolled around creamy ricotta then baked under a blanket of tomato and Mozzarella. The bite is total perfection – gooey cheese, tangy tomato, crunchy breading, and creamy ricotta – and I have been craving it bad.

Well, I did it. I really did. I made eight, low-carb eggplant rollatini rolls and because noone else likes eggplant I get to eat them all myself. :::queue evil laughter::::

Here are the steps to making the eggplant rolls in the eggplant rollatini recipe - restlesschipotle.com

A lot of people tell me they don’t like eggplant and then love it when I make it. I think there are two rules that you have to follow in order to get the perfect texture and flavor.

  1. Cover the sliced or diced eggplant with salt and let drain in a colander for 1 hour. Rinse well to get all of the salt off.
  2. Bake it long enough. Eggplant, when properly baked, has the texture of a firm custard — rich, smooth, and creamy.

In this recipe you’ll be cutting the eggplant longwise into thin slices — but not too thin. You’ll get about eight 1/4-inch thick slices from an eggplant. No need to peel it! The skin helps keep the rollatini shape.

Low carb eggplant rollatini recipe is perfect when you are craving Italian food. Restlesschipotle.com
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Eggplant Rollatini Recipe

Creamy eggplant with a crispy coating surrounds a filling of rich whole milk ricotta. It's covered with tomatoes and cheese and baked to perfection.
Prep Time 35 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings 8 rolls
Calories 183kcal
Author Marye

Ingredients

Eggplant

  • 1 eggplant sliced longwise in 8 1/4-inch thick slices
  • salt Kosher
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 1/2 cup canned diced tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 ounces Mozzarella shredded fresh

Breading

  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan cheese the kind in the green cylinder on the pasta aisle at the store
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon parsley

Filling

  • 1/2 cup whole milk ricotta
  • 2 tablespoons grated parmesan
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic

Instructions

  • Place the eggplant in a colander and cover with kosher salt, mixing so that the salt covers all surfaces of the eggplant.
  • Let drain 30 minutes to an hour.
  • Preheat the oven to 425F.
  • Spray a baking sheet with nonstick spray.
  • Rinse the eggplant well.
  • Put the beaten egg in a small dish.
  • Blend the coating ingredients on a platter.
  • Dip one eggplant slice in the egg and let the excess drip off.
  • Place in the coating mixture and cover with coating.
  • Lay on the baking sheet and repeat with the remaining eggplant.
  • Bake for 30 minutes, or until the breading is golden and the eggplant is cooked through.
  • About 10 minutes before it finishes baking turn the eggplant slices over.

Filling

  • Mix all the ingredients in a bowl.
  • Taste and add salt to taste.

Assembly

  • Turn oven down to 350F.
  • Spray 1 1/2 quart casserole dish with cooking spray.
  • Place 1 1/2 tablespoons of the ricotta on the end of the eggplant.
  • Roll the eggplant over the ricotta and place seam side down in the casserole dish.
  • Repeat until all of the eggplant slices are filled.
  • If you have ricotta left just tuck it in around the rolls.
  • Mix the olive oil and the tomatoes.
  • Pour evenly over the eggplant mixture.
  • Cover with shredded cheese.
  • Bake for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the filling is warmed through and cheese is melted.

Nutrition

Calories: 183kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 61mg | Sodium: 258mg | Potassium: 187mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 5.5% | Vitamin C: 1.7% | Calcium: 22.2% | Iron: 4.8%

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Last Updated 06/04/2019

16 Responses to “Eggplant Rollatini Recipe”

  1. I love love eggplant. I am even growing it in my garden. Your recipe sounds wonderful and I can’t wait to try it.

    Reply
    • Let me know what you think. 🙂

  2. I’m Italian, too! originally from New York. I’m 3rd generation, my great-grandparents came here through Ellis Island in the early 1900’s. I LOVE eggplant and your rollatini recipe looks amazing!

    Reply
    • Thanks so much!

  3. I LOVE the sound of this! Is almond flour like almond meal?

    Reply
    • Almond flour and almond meal are the same I think. 🙂

  4. I love making eggplant parmesan but haven’t tried in in this way. It looks absolutely delicious! YUM!

    Reply
    • Thanks! 🙂

  5. For breading, I usually use pork rinds. I take a bag of them, pulse them in the food processor until they resemble bread crumbs, the add Italian seasonings and pulse a few more times to mix well. Then I put them in an old Progresso Breadcrumb container that has been repurposed to hold my lowcarb “breadcrumbs” and I keep it in the freezer and use as needed. I make a baked chicken dish that my family begs for, and they’ve never missed having real breadcrumbs. 🙂

    Reply
    • Great idea!

  6. I am new to the blog and you may have answered this before…..but what is the purpose of the canned parmesan? I never buy it but always have a chunk of Parm in the fridge.

    Reply
    • It acts more as breadcrumbs than the fresh does. It adds texture and doesn’t melt as easily.

  7. I made this tonight and it is soooo good. I did not realize that the recipe called for the Kraft Parmesan and all I had was fresh shaved parmesan (big slices). I chopped them up as small as I could and it worked great. I’m so glad no one in my family likes eggplant. More for me!

    Reply
    • I am so glad you liked it!


  8. Please don’t use the Kraft blue container Parmesan cheese,not healthy full of fillers and they actually had sawdust in them until they were found out and supposedly are not in them;nothing like real cheese with no fillers;most food stores sell the fresh grated in a container!

    Reply
    • I disagree that it’s a problem. Cellulose is a fiber, with 0 carbs, that’s found in many foods in the US and approved in small amounts. “However, the plant fiber is legal in the U.S. and is an FDA approved anti-clumping ingredient for pre-grated cheese.
      FDA recognizes cellulose as “safe additive,” and it can be used at levels from 2 percent to 4 percent. Used throughout the food industry, cellulose gives foods like ice cream a creamier mouthfeel, and it’s used in good quality grated cheeses, as well as not-so-great quality cheeses.” You can read the whole article here – http://www.foodprocessing.com/industrynews/2016/kraft-heinz-in-lawsuit-over-parmesan-cheese-containing-wood-pulp/

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